Total 43 News Articles

  • 06 Jan
    eWellness Expert

    How to train your brains regulate negative emotions

    how to train brain

    Researchers are now claiming to change the brain's wiring to regulate emotional reactions with a simple computer-training task.

    Dr. Noga Cohen from the Ben-Gurion University said that these findings are the first to demonstrate that non-emotional training that improves the ability to ignore irrelevant information can result in reduced brain reactions to emotional events and alter brain connections.

    Cohen added that these changes were accompanied by strengthened neural connections between brain's regions involved in inhibiting emotional reactions. Read more..

     

  • 06 Jan
    eWellness Expert

    Lack of sleep can make your emotion go haywire

    lack of sleep

    If you feel cranky or grumpy after a night without sleep, it is because your brain’s ability to regulate emotions gets compromised by fatigue, say researchers.

    This is a bad news for adults who get less than six hours of sleep in night.

    The team from Tel Aviv University identified the neurological mechanism responsible for disturbed emotion regulation and increased anxiety due to only one night’s lack of sleep.

    The research reveals the changes sleep deprivation can impose on our ability to regulate emotions and allocate brain resources for cognitive processing.

    “Prior to our study, it was not clear what was responsible for the emotional impairments triggered by sleep loss,” said professor Talma Hendler of TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine.

    The team assumed that sleep loss would intensify the processing of emotional images and thus impede brain capacity for executive functions.

    “We were actually surprised to find that it significantly impacts the processing of both neutral and emotionally-charged images,” Hendler added. “It turns out we lose our neutrality.”

    “The ability of the brain to tell what’s important is compromised. It’s as if suddenly everything is important,” she said.

     

    (psychotherapy for insomnia)

     

    For the results, the researchers kept 18 adults awake all night to take two rounds of tests while undergoing brain mapping. 

    When sleep-deprived, participants performed badly in the cases of both the neutral and the emotional images and their electrical brain responses did not reflect a highly different response to the emotional images.

    "It could be that sleep deprivation universally impairs judgment, but it is more likely that a lack of sleep causes neutral images to provoke an emotional response," the team noted.

    The team also found that participants after only one night of lack of sleep were distracted by every single image (neutral and emotional).

    "We revealed a change in the emotional specificity of Amygdala, a region of the brain associated with detection and valuation of salient cues in our environment, in the course of a cognitive task," Ms Hendler said.

    These results reveal that without sleep, the mere recognition of what is an emotional and what is a neutral event is disrupted.

    The results appeared in the When sleep-deprived, participants performed badly in the cases of both the neutral and the emotional images and their electrical brain responses did not reflect a highly different response to the emotional images.


    "It could be that sleep deprivation universally impairs judgment, but it is more likely that a lack of sleep causes neutral images to provoke an emotional response," the team noted.

    The team also found that participants after only one night of lack of sleep were distracted by every single image (neutral and emotional).

    "We revealed a change in the emotional specificity of Amygdala, a region of the brain associated with detection and valuation of salient cues in our environment, in the course of a cognitive task," Ms Hendler said.

    These results reveal that without sleep, the mere recognition of what is an emotional and what is a neutral event is disrupted.

    The results appeared in the Journal of Neuroscience..

    Image source

  • 06 Jan
    eWellness Expert

    Positive emotions promote heart-healthy behaviour

    heart generic

    WASHINGTON:  People with heart disease may benefit from maintaining positive emotions, according to a new study.

    The study tracked more than 1,000 patients with coronary heart disease over the course of five years.

    Patients who reported higher positive psychological states were more likely to be physically active, sleep better and take their heart medications and were also less likely to smoke, compared to patients with lower levels of positive states.

    "Negative emotions and depression are known to have harmful effects on health, but it is less clear how positive emotions might be health-protective," said Nancy L Sin, postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Healthy Aging and in the department of biobehavioural health at Penn State.

     

    "We found that positive emotions are associated with a range of long-term health habits, which are important for reducing the risk of future heart problems and death," Ms Sin said.

    The researchers assessed psychological well-being of participants at baseline and again at a five-year follow-up by asking the participants to rate the extent that they had felt 10 specified positive emotions, including "interested," "proud," "enthusiastic" and "inspired."

    Physical activity, sleep quality, medication adherence and alcohol and cigarette use were also measured at baseline and again five years later. Read more....

     

     

  • 06 Jan
    eWellness Expert

    How emotion effect your Brain's creativity

    Brain creativity

    Emotional expression affects the brain's creativity network, says a new brain-scanning study of jazz pianists, adding that "happy" and "sad" music evoked different neural patterns in their brains.

    The workings of neural circuits associated with creativity are significantly altered when artists are actively attempting to express emotions, the researchers report.

    "The bottom line is that emotion matters. It can't just be a binary situation in which your brain is one way when you're being creative and another way when you're not," said senior author Charles Limb from University of California-San Francisco.

    "Instead, there are greater and lesser degrees of creative states, and different versions. And emotion plays a crucially important role in these differences," he explained.

    The team focused in a brain region known as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), which is involved in planning and monitoring behaviour.

    The researchers found that DLPFC deactivation was significantly greater when the jazz musicians improvised melodies intended to convey the emotion expressed in a "positive" image (a photograph of a woman smiling) than a "negative" image (photo of the same woman in a mildly distressed state).

    On the other hand, improvisations targeted at expressing the emotion in the negative image were associated with greater activation of the brain's reward regions
    "This indicates there may be different mechanisms for why it's pleasurable to create happy versus sad music," added first study author Malinda McPherson.


    For each musician, any brain activity data generated during these passive viewing periods, including emotional responses, were subtracted from that elicited during their musical performances.


    This allowed the researchers to determine which components of brain activity in emotional regions were strongly associated with creating the improvisations.


    Moreover, Limb said, the research team avoided biasing the musicians' performances with words like "sad" or "happy" when instructing the musicians before the experiments.

    Source